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In this photo taken Oct. 6, 2015, the website, where people can buy health insurance, is displayed on a laptop screen in Washington. The Obama administration says its strengthening privacy protections for consumers on the governments health insurance website ahead of a new sign-up season starting Nov. 1. In a blog Friday, CEO Kevin Counihan says the web page will have a new privacy manager that lets consumers opt out of embedded connections to third-party advertising, analytics and social media sites. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)WASHINGTON (AP) Responding to criticism from civil liberties advocates, the Obama administration said Friday it has strengthened consumer privacy protections on the government's health insurance website as a new sign-up season nears. . . more
FILE - In this Saturday, Jan. 1, 2015 file photo, Pauline Cafferkey, a nurse who contracted Ebola while working in Sierra Leone, smiles in the Royal Free Hospital in London. Londons Royal Free Hospital says a nurse who recovered from Ebola last year is being treated for an unusual late complication of the infection. A military aircraft flew Pauline Cafferkey from her home in Scotland to London early Friday, Oct. 9, 2015. The hospital says she will now be treated "in the hospital's high-level isolation unit under nationally agreed guidelines." Medical authorities say the risk of Cafferkey transmitting the virus is low, but public health officials in Scotland are monitoring people with whom she had close contact. (Lisa Ferguson/Scotland on Sunday/PA via AP) UNITED KINGDOM OUT - NO SALES - NO ARCHIVESLONDON (AP) A British nurse who recovered from Ebola last year has been hospitalized again for treatment of an unusual late complication, London's Royal Free Hospital said Friday. . . more
Fri, 09 Oct 2015 09:57:58 -0400 
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - A new blood test might help doctors figure out faster whether someones having a heart attack. The test reliably told doctors which patients were not having heart attacks after only one blood sample, compared to the current method that requires several hours and multiple blood samples, researchers found. "The ultimate goal would be to have a single blood draw for the majority of patients," said study author Dr. Atul Anand, of the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. . . more
HAMBURG/BERLIN (Reuters) - Volkswagen's core autos division will likely plunge into a loss this year as it is set to shoulder the bulk of the costs from the fallout of the company's rigging of diesel emissions tests, two company sources said on Friday. VW's namesake brand accounts for about 5 million of the up to 11 million diesel vehicles worldwide that need to be refitted because they could carry software designed to manipulate emissions tests. German magazine Der Spiegel reported the possible loss at VW's largest autos division by sales and revenue earlier on Friday. . . more
A logo is pictured outside the Nestle Institute of Health Sciences at the EPFL in Ecublens near LausanneNestle's health science division is investing $70 million in a product technology center that will become the unit's new U.S. headquarters and research hub, the division said on Friday. The Bridgewater, New Jersey center will further Nestle's healthcare push as the Swiss company delves deeper into nutritional therapy and the high-margin medicines arena. Opening in 2016, the hub will relocate the unit's current research and development activities from Minneapolis and its current headquarters from nearby Florham Park. . . more
Wounded Palestinian protester is carried during clashes with Israeli troops near the Jewish settlement of Bet El, near the West Bank city of RamallahBy Nidal al-Mughrabi GAZA (Reuters) - Israeli troops fired across the border into Gaza on Friday, killing four Palestinians and wounding at least a dozen others who were throwing stones during a rally in support of protests in Jerusalem, hospital officials in Gaza said. The demonstration was called in solidarity with Palestinians in the occupied West Bank and Jerusalem and followed a spate of attacks by Palestinians against Israelis and reprisals by Jews against Arabs. . . more
People walk past a chemist shop at a market in MumbaiBy Aditya Kalra and Zeba Siddiqui NEW DELHI/MUMBAI (Reuters) - As many as 850,000 small chemist shops in India will shut for a day next week to protest against a burgeoning online pharmacy industry that is attracting big money backers. Healthcare provider Apollo Hospitals Enterprise Ltd plans to start online drug sales in India, while Zigy, and Sequoia Capital-backed 1mg already have e-pharmacies to tap a retail market IMS Health says is worth about $13 billion. Varun Gupta, head of medical affairs at 1mg said the company gets up to 60 million hits a month on its website and its mobile app has been downloaded 3.5 million times since 2012. . . more
A sign is seen at an AstraZeneca site in MacclesfieldAstraZeneca has temporarily halted two clinical trials combining experimental drugs to treat lung cancer, following reports of lung disease in some patients, the company said on Friday. The trials involve giving its drug AZD9291, which is currently awaiting regulatory approval, alongside the immune system-boosting medicine durvalumab, also known as MEDI4736, to treat patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. AZD9291 and durvalumab are two of AstraZeneca's most promising experimental cancer treatments, although their use together in lung disease is only one of many possible applications. . . more
The blood of a survivor of Ebola virus is extracted as part of a study launched at Liberia's John F. Kennedy Hospital in MonroviaA growing awareness of how the Ebola virus can hide in parts of the body such as eyes, breasts and testicles long after leaving the bloodstream raises questions about whether the disease can ever be beaten. Virologists said Friday's case of a Scottish nurse, Pauline Cafferkey, who had recovered from Ebola but is now suffering complications adds to signs that the virus is a long-term health risk and can lead to a "post-Ebola syndrome". "Over the past few years there has been mounting evidence of mental and physical health problems in Ebola survivors that can last for years after the virus is cleared from the bloodstream," said Ben Neuman, an Ebola expert and lecturer in virology at Britain's University of Reading. . . more
Fri, 09 Oct 2015 07:50:11 -0400 
An Ebola patient is put on a Hercules transport plane at Glasgow Airport in ScotlandA Scottish nurse who contracted the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone last year but had seemingly made a full recovery was back in hospital in a serious condition on Friday after suffering a late complication from the disease. Pauline Cafferkey, 39, was transferred from the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow to an isolation unit at the Royal Free Hospital in London early on Friday morning, the Royal Free said in a statement. "Pauline Cafferkey is in a serious condition," the hospital said, adding that she was suffering from "an unusual late complication". . . more
FILE - In this Aug. 12, 2015 photo, people walk past a billboard warning residents to stop the stigmatization of Ebola survivors, in Kenema, eastern Sierra Leone. Johnson & Johnson has begun clinical trials for an Ebola vaccine in Sierra Leone. The vaccine regimen is part of a new study being conducted in Sierra Leone's Kambia district, where some of the country's most recent Ebola cases have been reported. The company said Friday, Oct. 9, that the first volunteers have received the initial dose. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. (AP) Johnson & Johnson has begun clinical trials for an Ebola vaccine in Sierra Leone. . . more
Volunteer Andrew Matzen receives a trial Ebola vaccine at the Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine in OxfordJohnson & Johnson has begun a clinical trial of a two-shot Ebola vaccine in Sierra Leone, underlining its determination to push ahead with development, even as the epidemic fades out in West Africa. The new study will investigate the experimental product's safety and its ability to provoke an immune response to the disease, which the World Health Organization says has killed more than 11,000 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Last week, for the first time since the Ebola outbreak was declared in March 2014, there were no new confirmed cases of the deadly disease in those countries, according to the U.N. agency. . . more
OSLO/STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Norwegian fingerprint sensor maker Next Biometrics said it would raise 120 million Norwegian crowns ($14.78 million) from Greenbridge Partners, a firm founded by Swedish investors Melker Schorling and Ola Rollen, sending shares soaring. "Greenbridge Partners Ltd has undertaken a thorough process before making the investment decision," Next said in a statement on Friday. Shares of the Norwegian firm shot up 64 percent at 0417 EDT. . . more
A man smokes near a portrait of late Chinese leader Mao Zedong hung on a replica of the Tiananmen Gate in Yinchuan in northwestern China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region on Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015. Research published in the medical journal The Lancet says one in three of all the young men in China are likely to die from tobacco, but that the number can fall if the men quit smoking. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)BEIJING (AP) Research published in the medical journal The Lancet says one in three of all the young men in China are likely to die from tobacco, but that the number can fall if the men quit smoking. . . more
Fri, 09 Oct 2015 03:33:49 -0400 
Health workers put on protective gear before entering a quarantine zone at a Red Cross facility in the town of KoiduA patient came to the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital on Wednesday with symptoms consistent with the viral hemorrhagic fever, staff there said. "We have sent blood samples for testing and quarantined identified contacts," the hospital's chief medical director, Queeneth Kalu, said. Nigeria's National Emergency Management Agency said 10 people were in quarantine. . . more
The state-run Singapore General Hospital said 678 patients as well as 273 medical workers were being contacted to be screened for the virusA hepatitis C scare linked to four deaths so far in Singapore widened Friday after its largest hospital said nearly 1,000 patients and health staff need to be screened for the virus. The state-run Singapore General Hospital said 678 patients as well as 273 medical workers were being contacted to be screened for the virus, local media reported, double the number initially estimated to be affected. The hospital earlier said 22 kidney patients had been infected with hepatitis C between April and June. . . more
Children come forward to get their feet disinfected after a Red Cross worker explained that they are spraying bleach, and not spraying the village with the Ebola virus, in ForecariahThe three West African countries at the heart of an Ebola epidemic recorded their first week with no new cases since the outbreak was declared in March 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Wednesday. The U.N. agency said that more than 11,000 people have died in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone in the world's worst known occurrence of Ebola, but there were no new cases in the week to Oct. 4. "Over 500 contacts remain under follow-up in Guinea, and several high-risk contacts associated with active and recently active chains of transmission in Guinea and Sierra Leone have been lost to follow-up," it said in its situation report. . . more