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NEW YORK (AP) — About half of all 16- to 18-year-olds coming into New York City's jails say they had a traumatic brain injury before being incarcerated, most caused by assaults, according to a new study that's the latest in a growing body of research documenting head trauma among young offenders. . . . more from Associated Press
Fri, 18 Apr 2014 17:16:28 -0400
NEW YORK (AP) — A second, milder wave of flu is hitting the Northeast. . . . more from Associated Press
NEW YORK (AP) — The government's latest report card on food poisoning shows a dip in salmonella cases but an increase in illnesses from bacteria in raw shellfish. The report counts cases in only 10 states for some of the most common causes of foodborne illness, but is believed to be a good indicator of national food poisoning trends. Highlights from Thursday's report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: . . . more from Associated Press
CHICAGO (AP) — The Illinois Medicaid program paid an estimated $12 million for medical services for people listed as deceased in other state records, according to an internal state government memo. . . . more from Associated Press
Fri, 18 Apr 2014 18:03:37 -0400
Four women with a genetic condition took part in a ground-breaking study. . . . more from ABC News
Fri, 18 Apr 2014 17:36:15 -0400
By Shereen Jegtvig NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women enrolled in a small study reported a reduction in symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after a series of yoga classes. However, women in a comparison group that didn't take the classes also reported a similar decline in symptoms, researchers found. "The yoga group did well - they improved in their PTSD symptoms - and our control group actually did well, which we didn't expect," Karen Mitchell told Reuters Health. Mitchell, from the National Center for PTSD at the VA Boston Healthcare System, led the new study. . . . more from Reuters
By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts on Friday denied a request by Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd to stay a lower-court ruling in a patent case that favored the developers of generic versions of Teva's top-selling multiple sclerosis drug. The decision could help pave the way for generic competitors of Teva's Copaxone drug to go on the market as soon as next month. Teva had sought to prevent the lower-court ruling from going into effect while the Supreme Court considers its appeal in the patent fight. At issue is a July 2013 ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in favor of two teams developing cheaper generic forms of Copaxone: one comprising Novartis AG's Sandoz Inc and Momenta Pharmaceuticals Inc, and the other comprising Mylan Inc and Natco Pharma Ltd. In his decision on Friday, Roberts, in a brief opinion, wrote that he was not convinced Teva had shown the "likelihood of irreparable harm" if the application was denied, because if Teva wins the Supreme Court case it can seek damages from the generic companies for past infringement on its patents. . . . more from Reuters
An Abbott Laboratories spinoff urged a federal appeals court to revisit a ruling in a case against GlaxoSmithKline Plc, but without disturbing landmark constitutional protections for gays and lesbians. In a brief filed with the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco on Thursday, AbbVie Inc said the full court should review an initial three-judge decision that found a gay man was improperly excluded from jury service due to his sexual orientation. The court in reaching that conclusion in January ordered a new trial for GlaxoSmithKline Plc against AbbVie, which contended Thursday that the 9th Circuit's ruling needed review due to its potential to affect "thousands of jury trials." But AbbVie said it is not asking for the court to reconsider a holding that heightened the constitutional protections judges in several Western states must now apply when evaluating laws that curtail gay rights. . . . more from Reuters
By Julien Ponthus and Nicholas Vinocur CLERMONT-FERRAND, France (Reuters) - A senior adviser to French President Francois Hollande quit on Friday over accusations of past conflict of interest linked to his work for pharmaceutical firms, adding to pressure on the unpopular Socialist leader weeks before European elections. Aquilino Morelle, Hollande's chief communications adviser, speechwriter and a main political strategist, has denied investigative website Mediapart's report that he had failed to obtain clearance for lobbying work when he was an employee of the public health inspectorate. The furore deals another blow to Hollande after heavy losses for his party in town hall elections at the end of March. Hollande, speaking during a visit to Clermont Ferrand in central France, said his aide had "taken the only option open to him". . . . more from Reuters
CHICAGO (AP) — For the more than 30 states that defaulted to the federal government under President Barack Obama's health care law, time may be running out to decide whether to create their own state-run insurance exchanges. . . . more from Associated Press
Video shows doctors assessing Wyatt Scott's ability to swallow. . . . more from ABC News
Fri, 18 Apr 2014 15:08:09 -0400
The Scott family started a website to find out what's wrong with baby Wyatt. . . . more from ABC News
Biogen Idec Inc is pricing its newly approved long-acting hemophilia drug, Alprolix, to cost U.S. patients, and insurers, about the same per year as older, less convenient therapies whose price can reach about $300,000 annually. The move could pressure rivals such as Pfizer Inc to lower prices for existing hemophilia treatments, which provide patients with life-saving infusions of a blood clotting agent, according to doctors and industry analysts. Biogen last month won U.S. and Canadian approval for Alprolix to treat hemophilia B, the more rare form of the condition that affects about 4,000 people in the United States and about 25,000 worldwide. "We think we have priced (Alprolix) to create parity with existing therapies on an annual cost of therapy basis," Tony Kingsley, Biogen's head of global commercial operations, told Reuters in a telephone interview. . . . more from Reuters
By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The type of insurance people have is tied to their risk of needing emergency aorta surgery, according to a new study. Compared to people with private insurance, people without insurance were more likely to need emergency surgery on their aorta, the largest artery that supplies blood to every part of the body. Hughes is the study's senior author from Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina. . . . more from Reuters
At least eight students have contacted the virus. . . . more from ABC News
Could this mark an end to overzealous photoshopping of models? . . . more from ABC News
Fri, 18 Apr 2014 12:17:18 -0400
Stevens Institute of Technology reports eight cases despite students having been fully vaccinated. . . . more from ABC News
Fri, 18 Apr 2014 11:06:15 -0400
By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Young people are smoking fewer cigarettes these days, but their cigar use is rising, which may partly be due to the popularity of flavored cigars, according to a new study. "The cigar market is the most heavily flavored of all tobacco products," said Cristine D. Delnevo, who led the research. "For decades, tobacco industry internal documents have highlighted that flavors appeal to youth and young people." Delnevo, who directs the Center for Tobacco Surveillance & Evaluation Research at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey in New Brunswick, and colleagues from the National Institutes of Health investigated recent market and survey data on flavored cigar use among young people. Delnevo and her coauthors analyzed an annual survey of drug and alcohol use among Americans ages 12 and up. . . . more from Reuters
By Ros Krasny WASHINGTON (Reuters) - In an expected move, the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Friday announced new measures to combat the spread of disease in the U.S. pig population. The agency said it would require reporting of the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv), which has killed millions of piglets over the past year, and the Swine Delta Coronavirus. USDA will also require tracking movements of pigs, vehicles, other equipment leaving affected premises. "USDA has been working closely with the pork industry and our state and federal partners to solve this problem. . . . more from Reuters
(This story from April 15 corrects name of researcher to Breiter, instead of Beiter, throughout story) By Alex Dobuzinskis (Reuters) - Young, casual marijuana smokers experience potentially harmful changes to their brains, with the drug altering regions of the mind related to motivation and emotion, researchers found. The study to be published on Wednesday in the Journal of Neuroscience differs from many other pot-related research projects that are focused on chronic, heavy users of cannabis. The collaborative effort between Northwestern University's medical school, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School showed a direct correlation between the number of times users smoked and abnormalities in the brain. "What we're seeing is changes in people who are 18 to 25 in core brain regions that you never, ever want to fool around with," said co-senior study author Dr. Hans Breiter, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University. . . . more from


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